Bill Gargiulo, VP of Customer Success

About Bill Gargiulo, VP of Customer Success

Bill Gargiulo is the Vice President of Customer Success at Webgility. He has built and managed cross-functional teams and operational messaging and service protocols for 20 years.

Hiring Oxymorons

Hiring OxymoronsFour essential character conflicts to look for in customer support employees, and the one single quality they all must possess

I’ve been in the management and customer service business for longer than I care to admit, but as the decades have rolled by, I’ve learned a thing or two about what to look for when hiring and training a stellar customer success team. And at the risk of offending sensitive ears, I think it’s worth stripping off the candy coating of HR for a minute to lay out the bare necessities required of anyone who represents your company to your customers. Too often in writing job descriptions and interviewing candidates, we focus on ascending progression of job titles, tech-dependent skill sets, and required degrees and certifications. Instead, look for customer success representatives with qualities that are unique to the human experience. To create a customer service team that performs at the highest level, learn to look for these four character conflicts.  Hiring Oxymorons: 4 character conflicts to look for in customer support employees #HR #HumanResources… Click To Tweet

Driven by results, but also enjoys the process
Results-driven employees can be a dream to manage, but not without the discipline and patience that’s often required when learning about a customer’s issues. Sure, it’s great to be able to check a box and provide support for a customer in minutes. But in many business, especially in the world of SaaS, it’s often necessary to approach customer issues with a set standard for process of elimination and a structured diligence. Many people find this infuriating. Ideally, you hire folks who can’t help but mull over clients’ cases after hours, despite the fact that you’re not paying them to do so. When interviewing, ask about a time when they had trouble solving a problem and ask about their approach, how long it took, if they felt like giving up, and whether or not they sought help. If this Sherlock Holmes quality is in their nature, they’ll probably have a few examples to share and likely report fairly specific details of their problem-solving process as well as deep satisfaction at finding a solution to the problem. Continue reading