New! Free white paper and resource kit

New! Free white paper and resource kitLearn how to bring organization and control to your online business

Today, the second day of IRCE, we’re pleased to announce a new white paper and resource kit outlining the Virtual ERP for e-Commerce. The kit includes:

  • White Paper: Survival for Online Sellers
  • Infographic: How does your online business stack up?
  • On-Demand Webinar: Introduction to the Virtual ERP
  • Guide: The Essential e-Commerce Tech Stack
  • Case Studies: Stories of growth and scale from 4 e-Commerce SMB

To download the resource kit, please click hereFree Download: Virtual ERP for #eCommerce resource kit! #BuildaBetterBusiness #Unify Click To Tweet

For the first time ever, industry leaders in storefront technology, accounting, inventory, shipping, and integration are joining forces to simplify operations and streamline data for e-commerce sellers. The result is the Virtual ERP for e-Commerce, a unified network of best-of-breed systems that gives independent sellers the same business intelligence, operational stamina, and competitive edge enjoyed by the massive alpha retailers. The Virtual ERP for e-Commerce offers both security and freedom from which to build a business that is profitable, sustainable, and scalable. Continue reading

22 Awesome Websites with Stunning Free Stock Images

22 Awesome Websites with Stunning Free Stock ImagesWritten by Tucker Schreiber for Shopify

We know your pain. You’re looking for free images for your website. You’ve looked far and wide for gorgeous, free images to use online, but keep running into cheesy pictures of people laughing at their salad. The good news is there are ton of different free and paid images for commercial use available online if you just know where to look.22 Awesome Websites with Stunning #Free #Stock Images Thanks, @Shopify and @TuckerSchreiber!… Click To Tweet

In this post, Shopify has graciously compiled the ultimate list of resources to source free images for your website. Whether you want free stock images for your blog, to download, or for commercial use—you’ll find them here. Take a look, and enjoy!

Why an Email Unsubscribe Can Be a Good Thing

Why an Email Unsubscribe Can Be a Good ThingWritten for Bronto Software by Greg Zakowicz, Senior Commerce Marketing Analyst

It’s a fact. Someone will unsubscribe every time you send a batch promotional email. And while we all hate to see our subscribers go, wouldn’t you be open to a higher unsubscribe rate if it meant increasing your revenue? How you view your unsubscribes not only affects your email strategy and its revenue potential, but it also influences improvements you should make to your automated messages and your yearly list growth goals. Let’s discuss. Great advice from @Bronto on Why an Email Unsubscribe Can Be a Good Thing #Unify Click To Tweet

People unsubscribe for a variety of reasons. The most common include receiving too many emails and irrelevant content. Often, the “too many” threshold is actually determined by the proportion of irrelevant content, those situations when the content is meaningless to the reader or fails to change from one message to the next. I know of retailers who send every day, or even multiple times daily, whose unsubscribe rate is no different than the retailer sending only a few times each week. While there may be an opportunity to drive additional revenue by increasing sends, we need to recognize the full impact of those sends on a subscriber database.

At what point do the inevitable unsubscribes begin to hurt your bottom line? Determining the cost of the unsubscribe is an important step to answering that question. Knowing the cost can help you optimize your sending strategy throughout the year, particularly when planning for periods of increased sending, such as the holiday season. Read more

Guess what? We’re going to Bronto Summit on April 24. Shoot us a note an let’s meet up in person: hello@webgility.com. Better yet, register now for our upcoming webinar with Bronto on April 11: How to Build a Better e-Commerce Email Campaign.

Dropship your way to financial freedom

Dropship your way to financial freedomOne of the biggest decisions you’ll need to make as an e-commerce business owner is also the one that could make or break your financial freedom.

How you control and distribute the products you sell through your site is a critical choice you have to make during the outset of your business development. In this post, we’re going to find out if the dropshipping method can help you attain financial freedom, or if managing the ebb and flow of supply and demand would be better handled internally.

Managing a profitable e-commerce business is a process that requires strategy, resilience, and a fair bit of trial and error. The day-to-day logistics of your business could change dramatically in the first year, depending on how much you learn and how quickly you learn it. Making changes is scary but necessary—and the more you understand about your options, the fewer changes you’ll need to make.#Dropship your way to financial freedom by guest blogger Patrick Foster from @myecommercetips #Unify Click To Tweet

For some creative e-commerce business owners such as artists, musicians, and carpenters— dropshipping doesn’t come into play. If you make the product you sell in house, you never need to consider wholesalers. However, if you create digital designs for your products but don’t manufacture them, a big decision will be how to cost-effectively manage the manufacture and shipping of your orders. Continue reading

Beyond Amazon: The Rise of the Niche Economy

Beyond Amazon: The Rise of the Niche EconomyAnd interview with Webgility CEO Parag Mamnani by Ina Steiner for EcommerceBytes 411

Amazon is an important marketplace, but online merchants should not limit themselves to a single channel, according to Parag Mamnani, the founder and CEO Webgility (pictured). He also notes that as Amazon is bringing about commoditization, there is a side effect: The desire on the part of shoppers for quality, unique, and crafted goods. Mamnani says sellers should find creative ways to use Amazon and other marketplaces: “My advice is to sell products on multiple channels, including Amazon,” he told EcommerceBytes. “Some retailers break down their inventory and sell just a specialized sub-section on Amazon to move larger amounts at lower margins. And some sell in bulk on their own website versus moving a single product on Amazon.”

Giants such as Walmart, Jet, Target, Costco, and Rakuten are expanding their footprints, as the Facebook marketplace, the inevitable Google marketplace, and Pinterest Buy It buttons mean social media selling also looms on the horizon. “This gradual disruption will give small businesses more choices from which to sell their products and that will lead to improved experiences for both the buyer and the seller,” according to Mamnani.

That provides not only opportunities, but challenges as well: “That increase in choice will also mean there will be more systems for online merchants to figure out and integrate.” So what are the lessons for merchants – should they be content to rely on Amazon for a majority of sales, or should they be diversifying – and if so, how? “In 2017 there will be plenty of folks who don’t want everything they own to be found on Amazon, and that is why marketplaces like Etsy are booming and custom Shopify stores are being launched every day. The niche economy will be sustained and grow internationally as entrepreneurs are more educated, supported, and empowered by the larger global ecommerce infrastructure that’s found on marketplaces and platforms.”

Where should smaller sellers be focusing their efforts – commodities or niche? “In the coming year, niche products, crafts, and small-batch merchandise are going to continue to accelerate in popularity. In fact, the very commoditization of most goods will cause individuality and quality to rise in value and importance. And since consumers are all buying the same commodity items, those costs will be driven even further down.”

Mamnani’s company services merchants with a wide range of revenue, between $250K to $50M each year. “Their revenue growth usually increases quickly once they add infrastructure efficiencies like automating sales data, inventory, shipping, and accounting,” he said. “We find that ecommerce owners who take steps to get out of the day-to-day minutia of operations and begin to focus on growth and data analysis see very quick returns on their investment in technology.” Continue reading