Congrats Company of the Year / Executive of the Year!

Congrats Company of the Year / Executive of the Year!Pardon the humble brag, but we’re thrilled for both our company and our fearless leader

Some weeks are better than others. And this one is particularly great, as both Webgility and our CEO Parag Mamnani have been recognized in the 2017 Golden Bridge Awards®. Parag is the gold winner of the executive of the year, cloud computing/SaaS/Internet category, while Webgility was the silver winner of company of the year in that same category.Congrats @ParagMamnani, Gold Exec of the Year, cloud computing/SaaS/Internet category @GoldenBridgeUSA Click To Tweet

The annual Golden Bridge Awards program encompasses the world’s best in organizational performance, innovations, products, and services, executives, and management teams from every major industry. Organizations ranging from startups to public companies participated in this year’s industry and peer recognition awards program. The lucky winners will be honored at the 2017 Red Carpet Golden Bridge Awards Ceremony in San Francisco on Monday, September 18, 2017.

Parag Mamnani interview in eCommerceBytes411Parag put the sentiments of our whole company into words when he said, “These awards are a testament to Webgility’s commitment to make business easier for sellers with a very simple aim—to unburden them from busywork and empower them to focus on building their dream business.”

As you know, Unify allows sellers to track and sync orders between any online store, software, or marketplace. It also gives sellers the financial reports and analytics it needs, unified from across their systems, to get the insights they need to build a sustainable—and profitable—business. For more information on Unify, please visit www.webgility.com/unify.

Announcing the e-Commerce Ecosystem

e-Commerce EcosystemBest-in-class systems working together to build a better business for you

As you know, online retail is much like the brick-and-mortar experience, albeit in a virtual world. The shelves need to be stocked. The inventory needs to be updated across all online stores and marketplaces. Of course, the online buyer doesn’t carry out the product, so shipping and order fulfillment are added into the mix. And to up the ante a bit, the buyer’s experience better be positive, because the instant gratification of sharing an online review—good or bad—is just a click away.Now #sellers can build #ecommerce businesses that last and grow. #Unify #ecosystem Click To Tweet

While online retail is often thought of as the land of opportunity, the speed at which e-commerce has developed has flooded the industry with tools meant to solve for every challenge. Nowadays, every necessary function of selling comes with its own SaaS application, desktop software, or platform—point of sale, shopping carts, and marketplaces; bookkeeping and accounting; email marketing and customer relationship management; payment processing; shipping and fulfillment; and inventory and warehouse management to name just a few. Without each of these vital tools, a business doesn’t exist, but running back and forth between these disconnected applications can exhaust and frustrate even the most enthusiastic seller.

The resulting side effect of this well-intended overcorrection is commonly known as app fatigue. In its mildest form, this unfortunate state of SMB chaos simply dampens the joy of selling online, and at its most severe and tragic, app fatigue causes dreaded e-commerce burnout. Sound familiar? Continue reading

User Research: Too little, too late?

User Research: Too little, too late?How this neglected and abused role is really the secret savior of modern business

Looking around at job boards, I see two trends in the area of user research:

  1. More businesses are hiring for this role and skillset
  2. Most companies fill this position later in their lifecycle

We live in a world where user research must be a priority and appear earlier both in a company’s lifecycle and in a product’s lifecycle. Very similar to other tacit roles like product management and UX design, companies assume that the skill or function gaps of the position are being covered with overlapping roles from other departments. Take Product Management, for example. Before a company hires their first Product Manager, they assume the engineering, marketing, and executive teams are performing all the core Product Management functions. Somehow, this disparate group is expected to handle the wide ranging functions of a Product Manager, but it often falls short to the detriment of the entire company.Given their importance, why do user research roles show up at larger companies too late? #Unify Click To Tweet

Most of us know the unfortunate reality of using a product that was designed with user experience as an afterthought—it’s just no good. But that’s exactly what results when a designer gets their first crack at improving the experience only when the product is in the final stages of engineering instead of when it’s in first-draft or just a fledgling idea. Of course the product will be lackluster, even after the designer wages a harrowing yet futile battle to make it useable and beautiful. Continue reading

Keep Calm and Jingle On

Keep Calm and Jingle On5 quick wins for a successful holiday season

By now, your holiday marketing plan is likely up and running, but with competition at an all-time high, consider a few of these effective strategies from Bronto‘s industry partners to give your efforts an extra boost.

Use Your Post-Purchase Data
Make it as easy as possible for your existing customers to come back and purchase again,” says Robert J. Moore, Head of Magento Analytics. “More than any other prospective customers, you know who these people are and what they like, such as product types, price points, and even what time of day they shop. Use this data to create special promotions and announcements that cost you very little to deliver but can have a major impact on your sales.”

Target Lapsed Customers
“The holidays are the best time to target your lapsed customers,” says AgilOne’s Laura Corbalis. “Identify everyone who hasn’t bought from you in over a year, and send them a holiday-focused ‘We miss you!’ message with a special deal. These customers are familiar with your brand, so sending them something that beckons them back can be a very quick win.”

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Happy Customers in 4 Easy Steps

Happy Customers in 4 Easy StepsSimple ways to set your service apart from the rest

When I started Webgility, my plan was to create and sell software with a simple goal: Help e-commerce business owners pursue their passion by automating some of the most painful aspects of running their business, like accounting. While the business plan certainly included top-drawer customer service, I did not realize how important it would be to the longevity and profitability of the business. Fast forward nearly 10 years, and I’m proud to say that customer service is one of the major areas in which Webgility stands far and above the competition. In fact, our customer service team is considered the best in the industry and, week over week, we earn a 98% (and often better) customer satisfaction rating. 4 ways to set your customer service apart from the rest by @ParagMamnani #ecommerce #sellmore #unify Click To TweetWhile providing great service did not happen overnight, I assure you it did not happen by accident. Below I’ve listed the four simple guidelines that have been instrumental in helping Webgility stand out as a leader in customer service.

Be available. Good customer service departments call people back. Great customer service departments pick up those calls before they go to voicemail and make time in their schedule for each and every customer. Look at the typical calling patterns of your customers and schedule ample coverage during high volume hours and days of the week, even if that seems expensive or inconvenient. Our customers consistently report that the unexpected bonus of our software is that they can always get a human on the phone at any time and we take great pride in meeting this simple expectation.
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